Category Archives: Camera News

Olympus Photo Contest for Instagram Photographers

photo contest for Instagram photographers

Olympus has announced a photo contest for Instagram photographers.  Here’s how it works:

Photo Contest for Instagram Photographers

1.)  Upload a photo to Instagram showing your baseball spirit, using
      #OlympusMLB

2.)   Ten lucky winners will win the opportunity to show off their
      photography skills using Olympus products at ballparks across the
      country

3.)    The two best photographers will be selected in a fan vote for the
      chance to become a reoccurring correspondent at additional MLB games

So just capture an instance of Baseball Fever and upload via Instagram or Facebook (to the the contest page on Facebook with #OlympusMLB in the title) and you could be one of  ten photographers who will receive a free Olympus E-M10.  Of those ten photographers, only two will go on to photograph select MLB games as correspondents.

What are you waiting for?  This photo contest for Instagram photographers has a deadline and it is looming – March 17, to be exact.  So go out and shoot already.

Also, take a look at the full contest rules here:

http://mlb.mlb.com/instagram/sponsored/olympus_rules.jsp

Canon ELPH 150 IS Review and Samples

canon elph 150 is sample image

It’s not for everyone, and straight out of the box it will disappoint anyone who has already handled anything better.

However, you can still get some great images out of the ELPH 150 IS.

Shooting with the Canon Powershot ELPH 150 IS

Menus and “Ergonomics”

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The menus are okay.  You probably won’t need to read the manual if you use cameras fairly often.  Personally, I think Canon has the most intuitive menus for beginners, and this camera is no exception.

I put ergonomics in quotation marks because there are no contours to this camera, really.  It’s a little box that has an on/off button on top, and a shutter release with a scroll for the zoom.  There are some buttons on the back and the thing isn’t as tall or wide as most smartphones, but maybe a little thicker.

Takeaway:  anyone can use this camera.

Lens Performance

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The lens on the ELPH 150 IS is pretty decent, with relative sharpness at it’s widest focal length (24mm equivalent).  Aperture is automatic, with f/3 at the wide end, and f/6.9 when the zoom is fully extended.  Due to the mostly-automatic nature of the camera, the default ISO of 800 at its 240mm equivalent focal length leads to a fairly grainy picture, but working with decent lighting will allow you to override the ISO in Program Auto mode.  Then you can set your ISO to a clean 100 and get fairly smooth shots.

Takeaway:  the lens is great at the wide end, even in auto.  Zooming way out to the maximum distance will leave you with grainy shots unless you adjust ISO in the menus.

ISO Performance

canon elph 150 is sample image   @ISO 100 canon elph 150 is sample image

@ISO 200

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@ISO 400

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@ISO 800

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@ISO 1600

A little grain is a given when using any camera.  Most of us accept that.  But thanks to a diminutive sensor, and the automatic tendencies of this camera to set ISO to some of the grainier extremes, it’s going to behoove most users to stick with 100 ISO if they don’t want a grainy look.  Personally, I found the image quality at 400 and 800 to be workable, but I would still keep away from 1600 unless I really didn’t care about grain/noise.

Takeaway:  change the camera mode to Program and adjust ISO to 100.  And leave it there.

Exposure Whacking

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I can’t use “exposure control” because that is misleading.  You’re in for a struggle when you want to change shutter speed on this camera.  That’s okay – you can easily adjust exposure compensation, but finding the in-menu controls for shutter speed is tough.  Very tough.

Takeaway:  memorize how to get back to your exposure compensation for quick adjustment when taking photos.

Flash

Well, it’s a fairly simple point and shoot flash.  It does seem to have some nice range on it, but it’s positioned to the left side of the lens.

Takeaway:  good most of the time but forget using it for extreme closeups.

Macro

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Probably the best thing about little point and shoot cameras these days are those stunning macro shots.  In fact, it’s one of the niches that point and shoot and ultra compact cameras still excel at.  The ELPH 150 IS has a close-focusing distance of 1 centimeter (or .39 inches).  Decent, to say the least.

Takeaway:  if you like taking macro shots, shell out $150 for this camera and have some fun.

Creative filters

canon elph 150 is sample image Toy Camera canon elph 150 is sample image Fisheye canon elph 150 is sample image

Monochrome

I guess this is Canon’s attempt to cash in on the same things Fuji and Olympus are doing so well.  The problem with these effects in a point and shoot body is that they wind up looking far, far, far…far far far worse than the same effects from Fuji or Olympus.  Sorry Canon…but you just can’t do it in a body this small.  There is a grid display that users can enable to see a rule-of-thirds guide, but nothing that will save the this camera from the pitfalls of its creative filters.

Takeaway:  avoid cancer of the retina and don’t use these filters.  The rule-of-thirds grid overlay (hidden in the menus) may actually be of more use to creative photographers.

Video

It’s a compact camera with images stabilization (hence the “IS” in ELPH 150 IS), but it’s a tiny 1/2.3” sensor.  And it is only HD - not FULL HD.  So yeah.  Video is kind of there.  It’s wonderful, I guess, if you want video in your camera.  Otherwise, yeah.

Takeaway:  um, yeah.

All in All

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Final opinion?  Not a bad little camera.  Clearly an automatic package for someone who just wants to “take good pictures” but might not have heard about camera phones yet.

You do get better image quality if you take the ISO down to 100 and utilize the flash a little, and macro is amazing on this camera.  But since most of the people who are buying this camera probably aren’t going to know how to overcome its quirks, I don’t expect it to hear much about it or see it flying off of the store shelves.

In all honesty, it reminds me of the people who used to buy family cameras and let everyone in the family use it to take pictures.  It would probably be nice for a picnic or a family reunion, but even the 10x optical zoom seems to have a hard time grabbing distant subjects with the kind of clarity most can find in marginally more expensive compacts.

It’ll be interesting to see where this camera goes, and if Canon might start making niche macro point and shoot cameras for those of us who would like something small and portable for unexpected situations.

Getty Embedded Image Viewer Born

getty embedded image viewer

Getty Images isn’t evil.  Despite whatever people say (or what photographers say).  No, Getty Images ins’t evil.  Would an evil company create an embedded image viewer to advertise itself on social media – with files so small that the photographer shouldn’t be paid for their use?  No, of course not.  No evil company would do that.

Say Hello to the Getty Embedded Image Viewer

Imagine some old-time photo cashcow right here, inside a cute and innocent little Getty image viewer.  

The news that stock photography is in dire straits isn’t exactly fresh.  Odds are, you’ve been hearing about it for a while.  If you’re like me, you’re already sick of hearing about it.  But the fact that a Getty embedded image viewer exists at all probably deserves some small amount attention.  Probably.

getty embedded image viewer

Look at those helpful ‘lil buttons in the right-hand corner.  Is that a freaking Tumblr logo?  Awesome.  

Fighting all that negative publicity over the Daniel Morel incident and the fact that bloggers no longer want anything to do with them, Getty Images will now use a free image viewer to help curtail image theft by giving low-res images away.  And hey, because those images are going to be a whopping 0.17 megapixels, there’s really no need to compensate the original photographer, right?

After all, it’s not like the Getty embedded image viewer is advertising material for Getty.  And it’s not like visitors to the blog are going to have the Getty Images brand shoved down their optical nerves every time they view a photo.  It’s not like visitors will keep going back to Getty to embed photos instead of paying for high-res files.

No one’s going to want something for free when they can pay for it.  And is a photo really stolen if it generates tons of traffic to Getty?

No folks, Getty Images isn’t evil.  Evil is something you find in photographers like Morel who want to besmirch the good name of Getty, and its dedicated staff of lawyers, accountants, and now snake-oil salesmen.  Evil is something you find in independent bloggers who use crappy images that were purchased by Getty after a buzzfeed or huffpost article.  But is evil something you find in the Getty embedded image viewer?  Absolutely not.

Unless Getty Images will get some traffic from it.  In which case, yes, you’ll be able to embed the bejesus out of it.

Canon Instant Rebates for March

canon instant rebate sample

Canon Instant Rebates for March!   Up and at ‘em, boys and girls!  Canon Instant Rebates are out for March, and apply to these compacts and point & shoots!  The rebates are effective March 2 through March 29.

March Canon Instant Rebates

 

canon instant rebate sample

 

Like DSLR options, but don’t want to spend DSLR prices?  Try the SX50 HS, which offers you control and image quality for a reasonable price.

PowerShot SX50 HS
Reg. Price $429.99 - $30 Instant Rebate = $399.99 Final Price

canon instant rebate sample

 

Though it might have one of the smallest Canon Instant Rebates, the SX510 is worth the money.  Not only does it take great images, but it’s one of the smallest, most portable cameras available.  

PowerShot SX510 HS
Reg. Price $249.99 - $20 Instant Rebate = $229.99 Final Price

canon instant rebate sample

The SX280 shows you don’t need a bridge camera to get multiple shooting modes, including that macro function that seems to be lacking on smaller cameras.  

PowerShot SX280 HS (black or red)

Reg. Price $279.99 - $80 Instant Rebate = $199.99 Final Price

 

canon instant rebate sample

 

Ah, the ELPH series.  It’s been around forever.  And with good reason:  not only are they some of the slimmest, sexiest compacts ever, but their image quality is astounding.  

PowerShot ELPH 330 HS (black, silver, or pink)
Reg. Price $179.99 - $50 Instant Rebate = $129.99 Final Price

canon instant rebate sample

PowerShot ELPH 130 IS (red, gray, or silver)
Reg. Price $149.99 - $40 Instant Rebate = $109.99 Final Price

canon instant rebate sample

PowerShot ELPH 115 IS (blue, silver, black, or pink)
Reg. Price $129.99 - $30 Instant Rebate = $99.99 Final Price

canon instant rebate sample

PowerShot A2500 (silver, red, or black)
Reg. Price $109.99 - $30 Instant Rebate = $79.99 Final Price

So if you’re in the market for a compact camera or a point and shoot, keep these Canon Instant Rebates in mind.  And if interested in the savings, but want a bit more from a camera, check out the rebates on Canon DSLRs here.

Fujifilm XT1 Review

fujifilm xt1 sample image

Since its announcement and fairly rapid release, the Fujifilm XT1 has been turning heads – and with good reason.  Sporting a solid retro design and cutting-edge technology, this camera has vaulted to the forefront of the mirrorless pantheon.  But how does it perform?

fujifilm xt1 sample image

Shooting with the Fujifilm XT1

First, let me say that I was very hyped to get my mits on a Fujifilm XT1.  Mirrorless has been growing on me as of late, no doubt helped along by the Olympus E-M10 – a stunningly capable camera in a small, lightweight package.  So it stands to reason the that this newcomer from Fuji would have me on tenterhooks, but reason abandoned me when I actually took one out for a test drive.

Truth be told, the Fujifilm is impressive on paper.  The pixelpeepers and gearheads out there know this.  You probably know this.  The full specs are intimidating.  The viewfinder is A-MAZ-ING.  It feels like any camera should.  You get a drive mode dial like on my Nikon D2Xs, complete with a freakin’ double-exposure setting.  There’s two (2!) kinds of focus peaking.  And let’s not forget that mouth-watering APS-C sensor.

But then you might use the Fujifilm XT1, and feel something vanish.

Let me elaborate.

The Lens

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For my review, I used an XT1 with the 18-55 kit lens at f/2.8-4.  I had my misgivings about shooting with the standard kit.  Much more enticing to me was the 27mm f/2.8.  But as most people just getting into Fuji might purchase the whole kit, I decided to review the body and the 18-55 together.

That being said, you’ll be impressed that a camera manufacturer supplies you with a lens that’s reasonably bright when compared to the competition.  Heck, you even get a lens hood.  But when you start to use the kit lens a couple things happen.

First, there’s the finicky fake-feeling “aperture ring” on the barrel of the lens.  It moves when the wind blows.  So you’ll find yourself changing aperture without meaning to, and missing several shots.  I tried putting adjusting aperture with one of the on-body control dials, but despite my menu telling me that’s what the dial was set up for, nothing ever happened.  So, yeah, that sucked.

Having an f/2.8-4 zoom lens is great an all, but with that crappy plastic aperture ring on there, it just sort of ruins the whole experience.  Some people are used to manual aperture rings.  You set the ring, and when you move your lens, the freaking ring should not change.  On this lens, it does.  And it screws you up.  And you just want to use manual lenses again.

Shutter Speed

I talked about control dials.  Now let’s talk about the shutter speed dial.  You set your shutter speed at full stops – 1/250, 1/500, 1/4000 – and then you can use a control dial below on the body to fine-tune that shutter speed to say, 1/300, 1/600, and so on and so forth.  I guess this stems from Nikon’s design faults with the DF, where users could change the top shutter speed dial to 1/250 and then move the control dial on the camera body to a shutter speed of 1/500 (without the top dial registering the change).  That being said, it makes shutter speed clunkier and more annoying to adjust.

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ISO

ISO is great if you’re shooting JPEGs only.  You get a range of 100-51200.  Then if you shoot in RAW, you get a diminished range of 200-6400.  Aside from that, you’ve got your ISO speeds on a dial that locks every time you have to move it.  So it doesn’t change accidentally, but you no longer get to rapidly change your ISO speed, either.

Drive Modes

Here the Fujifilm XT1 has made some nice headway.  You get all the drive modes you would expect, plus a bracketed setting, a double exposure setting, a panorama setting (which stitches quite well), and an “advanced” setting.

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The Viewfinder and LCD

Both of these are phenomenal.  You can get lost in that viewfinder.  It’s big, it’s bright, and it doesn’t let in any extra light.  It makes optical viewfinders look shallow and dark.  The LCD is crisp and bright.  It tilts.  It does everything a good LCD should do these days.

Image Quality

Image quality on the Fujifilm XT1 is what you would expect – sharp and crisp with excellent resolution and astounding color reproduction.  The added film simulator is a joy to play around with – more so than the Olympus art features, which seem aimed at amateurs, not film buffs.

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Film simulation modes include a black and white mode simulating certain filters, like red (used in the two photographs above), blue, green, or yellow.  

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Velvia/vivid film simulation.

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Astia/soft film simulation.  

Menus

Menus are very intuitive, especially for those coming from a Nikon background.

Overall Impressions

The Fujifilm XT1 has some wonderful features going for it – the best EVF on the market, a rather large sensor, and stunning image quality, as well as a love-it-or-hate-it retro design.  For those willing to learn with the camera, and harness the potential of new interfaces for shutter speed and aperture, disappointments will be few and far between.  For the rest of you old codgers out there, you might actually want to go the Olympus or Sony route, when it comes to mirrorless.

Note:  One thing I did not touch upon in this review was low-light performance.  A review specifically aimed at night-shooting with the XT1 will be coming soon.  

UPDATE:  To see how the Fujifilm X-T1 performs with the 10-24 f/4 R OIS, check out this review.

Shooting with the m. Zuiko Olympus 25mm F/1.8

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Today I got my hands on an m. Zuiko Olympus 25mm f/1.8 for a hands on review, ahead of the high-rollers over at DPReview.  I know my puny blog can’t really compare, but it ain’t conceited if it’s true, folks.

So without further ado…

Olympus 25mm f/1.8 Review and Samples!

When the Olympus 25mm f/1.8 was announced, it was met with some decent reception among Olympus fans, who have largely done without a 50mm equivalent so close to the “nifty fifties” we’ve all had some run-in with, whether it was back in the heydays of analog photography, or more recently in the digital field.

However, before the arrival of this lens, Olympus shooters have had to make do with the 25mm f/2.8 pancake.  Truly, pancake lenses are nice (and in regard to my own personal taste, preferred), but f/2.8 is a little dim for my spoiled self.  So, enter the Olympus 25mm f/1.8:  a 50mm equivalent we can not only live with, but excel with.

Of course, having always shot with a 50mm on a sensor with a 1.5x crop, my 50mm lenses were always used to shoot portraits.

But now, with a lens and sensor combo that gives me the actual field of view of a 50 on a full frame, I set out to do some slightly-distanced street photography.

The Setup:

olympus 25mm f/1.8 sample images

Before I got started, I had to decide on a camera body to shoot with.  The other half of my street photography equation?  The rugged if not a little minimalist E-PL1, now dated by its successors, but still offering quite the shooting experience at a very affordable price indeed.

As such, there are two facets to this review:  what the Olympus 25mm f/1.8 is capable of in terms of bokeh, sharpness, accuracy, and ease of use…and why cheaper models like the E-PL1 are a great way to get into the Olympus camera system without going bankrupt on newer models like the E-M line, or the newer Olympus Pens.

Sample Images:

All of these images are straight from the camera, shot in Large/Fine JPEG, with no retouching whatsoever.  Please excuse any over- or under-exposure, which I tried to keep to a minimum.

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Lens Performance

Five stars here:  excellent at 1.8, sharp where it needs to be in the center of the frame with only marginal falloff at the extreme edges.  Bringing your aperture down to f/5.6 or f/8 only makes things better, and given the focal length of 50mm, this lens is almost perfect for street photography – especially if you are a beginner or want to work with subjects at a distance.  Couple this with one of the OM-D cameras and you’ve got a DSLR-quality setup, offering crisp, quality captures with a low aperture to boot.

Camera Performance

Well, it ain’t no E-M1, but the Pen E-PL1 gives you some decent performance despite its inherent drawbacks.  First and foremost, there are no thumbwheels or control dials on this camera, except the mode dial on top.  That being said, the buttons aren’t bad, though adjusting while “in the moment” to capture a fleeting shot is a challenge and a half for any photographer.  The older Pens still give you some amazing image quality, and if you’re the kind of photographer to find a spot and wait for “the moment” to appear or unfold, you won’t regret buying one of these over the more expensive models.  The good think about the older models like the E-PL1 or even the E-PM1 is that you can set all the variables to whatever you prefer, and get back to looking for shots (instead of moving dials around constantly).  Like the other pens surrounding it, you’re getting a 14 megapixel sensor, but an older generation of the TruePic image processor.  The LCD screen on the back is fixed, recessed, and ugly – and only about half the resolution of the LCD screens on the latest Pens.  Obviously, you might want to shell out extra money for a more updated model.  The E-PM1 or the E-PL3 would be an optimal choice then, for those who want a lightweight but capable street photography platform with some of the newer features, including more recent image processors and higher ISO ranges.

So, overall thoughts on this adventure?  A blast to shoot with the lens, and moderately awesome to use the Pen E-PL1 as well, despite its age.  Given the fact that these cameras are still capable of attaining such amazing results, I would recommend the setup for anyone on a budget.  It might not be the best looking piece of machinery out there, but with a slick lens like the 25mm f/1.8, you might still win some compliments…and the results you’ll get from these two beauties are going to speak for themselves.

Sigma DP2 Quattro Unveiled

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Sigma has always struck me as a straightforward designer, with the exception of the Foveon Sensor, which seems to have a polarizing effect on the photographic community.  That aside, what they’re doing with the DP line of compact, APS-C sensor cameras right now is, well, pretty freaking cool.

Sigma DP2 Quattro:  Slick, Sexy, and Serious

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Camera design is going places.  Everyone it seems, with the exception of the Nikon and Canon behemoths, is trying new things.  Nowhere is this more evident than in the Sigma DP2 Quattro, which not only sports a breakaway appearance from the well-established DP series of camera, but switches up the sensor technology to boot.

Let’s talk about the grip for a second.  Grips are a big deal these days, and we whine and complain when they’re lacking.  We miss the stability and we miss the control, and one manufacturer has remedied that with a grip swept off to the side on the Sigma DP2 Quattro.  While it might remind you of the early days of digital photography and the wacky (obscene?) designs of yesteryear’s dusty digicams, what we’re looking at here is obviously a move toward not only more control, but better ergonomics in the compact pantheon.  A welcome move indeed.

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Then second big piece of news coming from the announcement of the Sigma DP2 Quattro is the modifications that have taken place to the Foveon sensor – now named the Foveon X3 – allowing the top layer to record 19.6 megapixels of luminosity, while the bottom two layers handle 4.9 megapixels of color apiece.  The gist of this setup is that the top layer will be primarily concerned with resolution, while the bottom layers snag the colors.  The Sigma DP2 Quattro, according to it’s creators, then spends less time processing in between shots, and increases noise performance.

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The camera is coming in three distinct packages, with fixed focal lengths equivalent to 28, 45, and 75 mm on a full frame sensor.  The DP2 Quattro will sport the 45 mm equivalent focal length, with the DP1 Quattro and DP3 Quattro sporting the 28 and 75 mm equivalent focal lengths, respectively.

Another new amenity offered by the Sigma DP2 Quattro will be a 39 megapixel super-JPEG (JPEGodzilla?) that will give the gearhead in all of us an eye-rolling, tongue-lolling uber-high-res image.  Whew.

As far as the LCD screen goes, there will be no change in resolution, and the only real change other than those listed above will be a different battery and a slightly heavier (but more balanced) camera body.

Olympus E-M10 Review and Samples

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Today (tonight?), I took the Olympus E-M10 out for a spin around Midtown.  Actually, I took around Times Square for a little bit, before getting depressed at how garish and commercial that place is.  But I digress.  Here’s my working review of the Olympus E-M10, with specific regards to how well this camera works on the street and in low light.  So if your an urban shooter, or a night shooter, this review is for you.

Olympus E-M10:  a Proper Camera in its Own Right

A lot of reviews and commentary on this camera are going on about where it sits in the Olympus lineup.  Depending on who you are (and in some cases, whether or not you already purchased an E-M5), this camera is either the camera that has replaced the E-M5, or a lacking upstart.

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The Olympus E-M10 has a similar overall design to that of the 5, the big points of interest being a loss of weather sealing and accessory port, but the added features of a pop-up flash and built in WiFi.  I didn’t test either of these features this time around, because we all know how they work, and the big question for this camera, more than any other, is who should buy it.

Should you buy it?  What is it good for?  How does it perform in real world scenarios?  Is it on-par with other similarly-priced cameras out there?

Here are your answers.

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So what reasons would compel someone to buy this camera, or, why should anyone anywhere buy it?  Do not be mistaken – despite the fact that it’s a decent little camera, it certainly isn’t for everyone.  While the E-M5 began the OM-D series, and the E-M1 offered numerous advantages, the E-M10 is that entry-level model for those who want to go Micro Four-Thirds, but haven’t yet.  It’s a camera aimed at people who want something along the lines of a DSLR, but in a slightly more stylish and a little bit more expensive body.

Image quality is alright, with moderate but permissible grain around 3200, but getting worse from there – to the point of marring your images.  Considering that most people who will buy this price-conscious camera are going to be uploading to Facebook and Flickr, and probably not doing large prints, this camera could work for a certain demographic.  Is image quality on par with an entry level DSLR from Canon or Nikon?  No, but it doesn’t have to be, either.

For street shooting, like all other Olympus cameras, it’s a decent little shooter, with the strongest selling point being its portability.  Travel photographers will also appreciate this characteristic, and for those who want something marginally more robust than a Stylus or compact or even a Pen camera, the Olympus E-M10 would be the route to go.

Olympus Instant Rebates Now through March 1.

olympus instant rebates

Didn’t get what you wanted for Christmas?  Missing that one last piece of camera gear to round out your arsenal?  Good  news everyone!  Olympus is extending December rebates until January 4th!  Olympus Instant Rebates are available on twelve items.

February Olympus Instant Rebates

 

olympus instant rebates

SH-50 iHS
Reg Price:  $299.99 - $50.00 Instant Rebate = $249.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebates

FCON-T01 Fisheye Converter
Reg Price:  $119.99 - $20.00 Instant Rebate = $99.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebates

FCON-T01 Fisheye Converter Tough Lens Pack
Reg Price:  $139.98 - $20.00 Instant Rebate = $119.98 Final Price

olympus instant rebates

TCON-T01 Telephoto Converter
Reg Price:  $109.99 - $20.00 Instant Rebate = $89.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebates

TCON-T01 Telephoto Converter Tough Lens Pack
Reg Price:  $129.98 - $20.00 Instant Rebate = $109.98 Final Price

olympus instant rebates

TG-830 iHS
Reg Price:  $279.99 - $50.00 Instant Rebate = $229.99 Final Price

TG-830 BLK w/ 8×21 RC II WP Blue Binoculars
Reg Price:  $299.99 - $50.00 Instant Rebate = $249.99 Final Price

TG-830 BLK w/ 8×21 RC II WP Magenta Binoculars
Reg Price:  $299.99 - $50.00 Instant Rebate = $249.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebates

VR-370
Reg Price:  $129.99 - $40.00 Instant Rebate = $89.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebates

XZ-10
Reg Price:  $399.99 - $100.00 Instant Rebate = $299.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebates

XZ-2
Reg Price:  $599.99 - $100.00 Instant Rebate = $499.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebates

Stylus XZ-2 x/ PT-054 Underwater Housing
Reg Price:  $926.98 - $100.00 Instant Rebate = $826.98 Final Price

Looking for lenses?  The following Olympus Instant Rebates are available when you purchase one of these lenses and either an E-M1, E-M5, E-M10, or E-P5.

olympus instant rebate

ED 14-42mm f3.5-5.6 2R MICRO
Reg Price:  $299.99 - $200.00 Instant Rebate = $99.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebateED M.14-42mm f3.5-5.6 EZ III
Reg Price:  $349.99 - $100.00 Instant Rebate = $249.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebate

M. Zuiko 12mm f2.0
Reg Price:  $799.99 - $200.00 Instant Rebate = $599.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebateM. Zuiko 75mm f1.8
Reg Price:  $899.99 - $200.00 Instant Rebate = $699.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebateM. ZUIKO 9-18mm
Reg Price:  $699.99 - $200.00 Instant Rebate = $499.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebate

M.12-40mm f2.8 PRO BLK
Reg Price:  $999.99 - $200.00 Instant Rebate = $799.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebateM.12mm F2.0 BLK SPEC EDITION
Reg Price:  $1099.99 - $200.00 Instant Rebate = $899.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebateM.17mm f1.8
Reg Price:  $499.99 - $100.00 Instant Rebate = $399.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebateM.25MM f1.8
Reg Price:  $399.99 - $100.00 Instant Rebate = $299.99 Final Price

olympus instant rebateM.Zuiko 75-300mm II
Reg Price:  $599.99 - $100.00 Instant Rebate = $449.99 Final Price

So there you have it folks!  More savings with Olympus Instant Rebates this month, whether you’re looking to round out your tough camera with a fisheye or telephoto converter, or looking for an adventure pack with a camera and binoculars, or if seeking extra savings by pairing a Olympus lens with an E-M1, E-M5, E-M10, or the E-P5.  Whatever your need, Olympus Instant Rebates have you covered.

Canon Instant Rebates for February Part 2

canon instant rebate sample

Canon Instant Rebates for February don’t just apply to DSLRs, but also compacts and point & shoots!  These rebates are effective now through March 1st.

Canon Instant Rebates for Compact Cameras

 

canon instant rebate sample

Though it might have one of the smallest Canon Instant Rebates, the SX510 is worth the money.  Not only does it take great images, but it’s one of the smallest, most portable cameras available.  

PowerShot SX510 HS
Reg. Price $249.99 - $20 Instant Rebate = $229.99 Final Price

canon instant rebate sample

The SX280 shows you don’t need a bridge camera to get multiple shooting modes, including that macro function that seems to be lacking on smaller cameras.  

PowerShot SX280 HS (black or red)

Reg. Price $279.99 - $30 Instant Rebate = $249.99 Final Price

 

canon instant rebate sample

 

Ah, the ELPH series.  It’s been around forever.  And with good reason:  not only are they some of the slimmest, sexiest compacts ever, but their image quality is astounding.  

PowerShot ELPH 330 HS (black, silver, or pink)
Reg. Price $179.99 - $50 Instant Rebate = $129.99 Final Price

canon instant rebate sample

PowerShot ELPH 130 IS (red, gray, or silver)
Reg. Price $149.99 - $40 Instant Rebate = $109.99 Final Price

canon instant rebate sample

PowerShot ELPH 115 IS (blue, silver, black, or pink)
Reg. Price $129.99 - $30 Instant Rebate = $99.99 Final Price

canon instant rebate sample

PowerShot A2500 (silver, red, or black)
Reg. Price $109.99 - $30 Instant Rebate = $79.99 Final Price

So if you’re in the market for a compact camera or a point and shoot, keep these Canon Instant Rebates in mind.  And if interested in the savings, but want a bit more from a camera, check out the rebates on Canon DSLRs here.

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